Academics
Program of Study

Science

RMA’s Science department offers courses that include required  classic subjects  such as biology and chemistry, as well as a diversity of electives. These range from Advance Placement Biology, Chemistry and Physics to course in Forensics, Environmental Science, Earth Science and Astronomy. Each course in this department conforms to the Georgia Performance Standards. Our objectives include learning the fundamental content and vocabulary of core science branches while illustrating connections between different fields and cross curricular integration.  Additionally, students engage in the scientific method through guided experimentation, measuring observed data, and analyzing their results to make conclusions. Traditional means of teaching are coupled with collaborative activities, laboratory experiments, and creative projects to solidify the material covered during classroom lessons. All science courses develop the skills of critical thinking, verbal and written communication, as well as applied mathematical reasoning. RMA believes the study of science can enrich lives, create informed citizens, and strengthen our civilization by developing young men who are equipped with problem solving skills.  
 

Science Courses

List of 14 items.

  • Life Science (7th Grade)

    This course emphasizes development of scientific thinking and process skills.  Cadets learn to set up and conduct investigations that result in improved conceptual knowledge and group cooperation. Students gain an understanding of the common strands of life in science including, diversity of living organisms, structure of and function of cells, heredity, ecosystems and biological adaptation.  They explore the nature of science and scientific inquiry by working with other cadets to make observations based on data collection and analysis. Objectives are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards for 7th Grade Life Science.  In addition to the content material, emphasis is placed upon Scientific Inquiry, Research, Organizing, Note Taking, and Presentation.
  • Physical Science (8th Grade)

    This is a course for cadets to explore fundamental physics concepts and learn to utilize these skills and principles in real-world applications. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of science and scientific inquiry by working with other cadets to make predictions based on data, patterns and events. Objectives are tied to the Georgia Performance Standards for 8th Grade Physical Science.  Physics principles such as measurement, data collection, accuracy, reliability, organizing data, interpreting data, patterns and predictions, and theoretical probability will be applied.  Students are also introduced to the fundamentals of chemistry, motion and forces, electricity and magnetism, sound waves, light rays, and energy transfer.  In addition to the content material, emphasis will be placed upon Scientific Inquiry, Research, Organizing, Note Taking, and Presentation. 
  • Earth Science

    This course is designed to extend students’ knowledge of the physical world around them.  Topics covered are composition of the earth, surface processes of the earth, atmosphere and oceans, dynamics of the earth, geological time, resources, and the universe.  Instructional methods include concept descriptions and definitions and applications and problem solving.  Assessments include classroom activities, laboratory exercises and tests. Students become familiar with the natural processes of Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, and Astronomy. These objectives conform to the Georgia Standards.
  • Biology

    The dynamics of life is a course in biology that follows a phylogenetic approach in its organization.  This approach allows one to explain the diversity of life forms in depth while revealing their relationship and fundamental unity in form and function.  This course capitalizes on topics such as the Scientific Method, Biochemistry, Cells, Photosynthesis, Mitosis/Meiosis, DNA, Genetics, Evolution, Classification, Viruses/Immunity, and fungi, Invertebrate Animals, Vertebrate Animals/Humans and Ecology.  The text is used as a resource and does not force the planning of units.  Supplemental materials and reading will be utilized throughout every unit.  The lab work represented is the minimum number of possible lab experiences and acts only as guide. Further laboratory experiences will be used when appropriate.
  • Advanced Placement Biology

    This is a college-level course designed to prepare students for the AP Examination.  It differs significantly from the usual first high school course in Biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, and the scope of laboratory investigations.  This course emphasizes the biological concepts specified in three major topics: Molecules and Cells, Heredity and Evolution, and Organisms and Populations.  The course is broken down into two parts: classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory experiments;  75% of the time is spent in classroom instruction, and the remaining 25% in performing laboratory experiments. Students enrolled in this course beyond the drop /add date must take the AP exam.
  • Chemistry

    This course is a first-year course in chemistry with classroom lectures and complementary laboratory sessions.  Students develop a balanced understanding of chemical fundamentals and chemical problem solving. The use of Chemistry: Matter and Change offers a traditional approach to the learning of chemistry. Students are expected to perform basic arithmetical and algebraic manipulations of the various chemical equations and observe the physical significance of such manipulations. Prerequisites for this course include the mastery of basic arithmetic skills and proficiency in Algebra I and Algebra II. General Chemistry offer a basic approach to learning science with the use of occasional open-note quizzes and tests, helpful memory aids that will expedite the learning process, and an abundance of guided math review that will ensure the comprehension of the basic math concepts that are necessary to science.
  • Honors Chemistry

    This course is a first-year course in chemistry with classroom lectures and complementary laboratory sessions.  Students develop a balanced understanding of chemical fundamentals and chemical problem solving. The use of Chemistry: Matter and Change offers a traditional approach to the learning of chemistry. Students are expected to perform basic arithmetical and algebraic manipulations of the various chemical equations and observe the physical significance of such manipulations. Prerequisites for this course include the mastery of advanced arithmetic skills and proficiency in Algebra I and Algebra II. Honors Chemistry is designed to prepare a student for the Advanced Placement experience. Each student will be expected to already have a strong mathematical background, as the pace of Honors Chemistry will offer little chance for math review.
  • Physics

    This course provides the student a foundation in physics and laboratory skills.  The course encourages student participation and appreciation for using the scientific method as a practical tool to better understand the dynamics of nature and the universe.  The course also emphasizes how mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena can aid in solving real-world problems.  Particular attention is paid to the diverse learning needs of students.  Mastery learning of physical concepts is emphasized throughout the course.  
  • Advanced Placement Physics 1

    AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based course in general physics that meets for the entire school year. General physics topics presented during the course closely follow those outlined by the College Board and also mirrors an introductory level university physics course.

    AP Physics 1 is organized around six big ideas that bring together the fundamental science principles and theories of general physics. These big ideas are intended to encourage students to think about physics concepts as interconnected pieces of a puzzle. The solution to the puzzle is how the real world around them actually works. The students will participate in inquiry-based explorations of these topics to gain a more conceptual understanding of these physics concepts. Students will spend less of their time in traditional formula-based learning and more of their effort will be directed to developing critical thinking and reasoning skills.
  • Advanced Placement Physics C (Mechanics)

    AP Physics C (Mechanics) is a one year course at Riverside Military Academy and equivalent to a first semester college course taken by chemistry, physics and engineering majors, and uses introductory differential and integral calculus throughout the year.  The mechanics portion of the course covers topics in kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation.  Students in the course are expected to learn and apply over 35 different physics and calculus equations. The laboratory is an integral part of the course, involving self-directed study and in-class lab experiments.  The student is expected to take the AP Physics C examination in May of each academic year with the objective of either being placed at a Honors level college Engineering physics course or given course credit equivalent to the first semester of this type of course at their respective colleges or universities.
  • Astronomy

    This is a research-based class, and knowledge of basic physics concepts and mathematical operations is expected.  The course is divided into four areas: planetary astronomy; stellar astronomy; cosmology; and scientific data gathering, processing, and presentation. Much of the work will be computer based using NASA material and other internet-based sources.  The instructor will rely heavily on GEARS resources acquired during summer workshops.  Group and individual project participation is required. Class activities include lecture, lab and demonstrations, observation times, and field trips.
  • Anatomy and Physiology

    This is a one-semester course designed to give the student a general knowledge of the functions of the organs and systems of the human body. The student will understand how the different parts of the human body function.  He will be able to discuss the digestive process, respiratory system, reproductive system, nervous system, integumentary system, muscular system, skeletal system, endocrine system and cardiovascular system.  
  • Environmental Science

    Environmental Science is taught as a year-long course designed to study the connections and overlap between a variety of science disciplines including biology, earth science, chemistry, and physics. This course gives students a very realistic picture of the vast array of scientific concepts and helps to show how these concepts are manifested in our environment.   During this first semester of environmental science, students will focus on human population growth, natural resources, and ecosystem dynamics.  The aim of the Environmental Science course to increase the student’s knowledge of the environmental challenges of today, while continuing to cultivate scientific critical thinking skills.
  • Forensic Science

    This course should be offered to juniors and seniors that have completed Biology and Chemistry.  The overriding concept of this class is a blending of various science disciplines with practical applications.  By means of such venues such as lab exercises the student would engage in learning or reviewing the applicable sciences involved and then writing a lab report on his results.  These sciences and areas within are as follows: Biology, insects and DNA; Anatomy, hair bones, respiration, fingerprints, bodily secretions; Physics, firearms ID, ballistics, glass, and Chemistry, fibers, poisons and bombings and fire residue.

Contacts

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